DUNES | Take Me To The Nasties | ALBUM REVIEW

Dunes | Take Me To The Nasties | Album review

Review by: Graeme J Baty

 

Here’s a band that I’ve followed since their early days. That said, technically it still is the “early days” as the band have only been going since around late 2016. They’ve been consistently brilliant live and have carved their own little niche in the Northeast scene.

What they do, they do really well and it’s impossible not to adore their sound. Some critics might be a bit harsh in comparing them to some obvious influences (that will not be mentioned here!). It’s all too easy to dismiss music that way and not truly enjoy it for what it is. Dunes make fantastic anthemic riff-fests with tongue in cheek witty lyrics. There is nothing quite like them in the local scene and they’ve been a delight to witness as they evolved from their fist lineup as a four-piece then moving smoothly to three-piece as guitarist Scott departed. Since then they’ve released two well received EPs and have played countless gigs around the country.

At long last we get their debut LP! The LP will be released on legendary Durham based label Sapien Records (We Are Knuckle Dragger, Big Lad, Steve Strong). I’ve been basking in this rifforama album for a month or two and have been trying to put it into words. I’m not sure I can. To me, Dunes is more of a feeling than a definable sound. They bring a smile to my grumpy face.

The title track ‘Take Me To The Nasties’ kicks off the record and is classic Dunes. A well-placed track allows them to set out their stall and prepare you for a hook and riff barrage. Ten meaty tracks, smashed out in just under 43 minutes. It’s a no-nonsense, no ostentation album that will draw you back for repeated listens. Denim Casket proves the album standout and has become a live favourite recently.

The sound and production is really solid, the bass tone is simply lush, that coupled with one of the finest drummers in the region and the magic touch of singer/guitarist John Davies, everything he seems to be involved with turns to audio gold. The production recorded at their rehearsal rooms by Graham Thompson remarkably captures the Dunes sound and brings a vibrant live feel, yet polished and subtle. It’s the perfect balance for a band like Dunes. No gross over production and endless overdubs. The sound is minimal and all the more impactful for it.

It’s an album that you just want to crank up and bob your head until it hurts. Which, I must admit I have done, sorry neighbours! Dunes are a good old fashioned hook driven party band. It’s simply impossible not to smile and adore this record.

Out on 6th Sept 2019

PHARMAKON | Devour | ALBUM REVIEW

Pharmakon | Devour | Album review

Review by: Jimmy Hutchinson

‘Devour’ is the fourth album from Margaret Chardiet’s recording project Pharmakon, and it was recorded live in the studio by Ben Greenberg from hardcore act Uniform. The listener is encouraged to engage with the live nature of the recording, and to that end the digital copy of this album is provided in two continuous sides as well as five individual tracks.

‘Homeostasis’ and ‘Spit It Out’ begin the proceedings in a sinister but fairly minimal vein, employing looped noise, electronic drones, indecipherable vocals and the occasional beat to establish a disquieting atmosphere. By ‘Self-Regulating System’ at the end of Side A, however, the album starts to sound (for all intents and purposes) like a building site. In the grand tradition of early Einstürzende Neubauten, whirring, screeching and distorted yelling are all present.

The second side continues in similar aggressive fashion with a deluge of feedback and further screaming. ‘Deprivation’ could be a ‘Metal Machine Music’ for the 21st century, except that the production values aren’t much higher than they were in 1975. The vocals on ‘Pristine Panic/ Cheek by Jowl’ take on an insistent, rhythmic quality over a repetitive mechanical whir before further chaos ensues, and this is probably the most fertile section of the album. The relentless noise calls to mind a factory methodically destroying itself – a vision which ties in with Chardiet’s stated theme of cannibalism and human self-destruction. (Jim Jarmusch’s new film The Dead Don’t Die explores similar thematic territory.)

Not for the faint-hearted then, but if you are interested in music that pushes extremes to explore concepts then this album may well be of interest to you. In an era of randomly generated playlists, it’s refreshing when artists still encourage their audiences to experience music in longer forms.